Tuesday, 14 June 2016

The New Normal | Plastic Surgery and Millennials

more millennials getting cosmetic surgery uk

Over the past few years, a lot has changed by way of aesthetics and what people are into - and by that I mean we're all getting pumped up to the nines with filler and all guys (and girls) care about lately is a Kim K style booty to grab hold of (you know, 'cause that's easily achievable *rolls eyes*).

Until recent years, plastic surgery was for the likes of the rich and the famous, the Playboy bunnies of the world... And the Pete Burns and Jodie Marsh's. Today, every Z list reality star in the UK has dabbled in it and that girl that passed you in Co-Op this morning probably has too. It's an evolution of either vanity or self-consciousness and most of the time, it's hard to tell which.



In my own case, it's probably both. Cosmetic surgery isn't something to be taken lightly, but with the constant developments in the industry, it's hard to brush off when it has become as simple as a lunch-break tweak here and there to fix a few minor issues that bug you when you're staring at yourself in the mirror. I mean, you can even get a non-surgical nose job these days.
We've always been obsessed with our looks. That's how shaving our legs, wearing high heels, red lipstick and hair cuts came about, so vanity is nothing new to us - therefore taking that point into consideration, why is cosmetic surgery so taboo to most of us still? It's just a bit of Juvederm, isn't it?
Our parents and grandparents still see cosmetic surgery as the scary botch jobs showcased on documentaries and cause for thousands of pounds worth of debt to 'ruin your body', rather than the much diluted version of the industry that it is today that allows even the slightest of enhancements in comparison to many years ago.

We could sit and talk about the objectification of women over the years, the male gaze and it's effect on our appearance, but what it really comes down to is how we feel and what we want to see ourselves when our reflection's staring back at us. It's our personal perception of beauty, the one thing we wouldn't ever blame because 'society says' we need to look this way. We don't need to look that way, and society didn't say that. Society is walking her dog, minding her own, cooking dinner for the grandkids while we continue to pick our own selfies apart and facetune the shit out of them, thinking we probably wouldn't have this problem if we'd had a chin implant.

kardashians rise in cosmetic surgery blog

Yep, I went there. I'm blaming the selfie. There hasn't been a time in history where humans have been so aware of themselves and their appearance. Being wary of your double chin or your profile only mattered to TV stars who the world saw every evening on their screens, but a lot's changed since then and technology has given the rest of us our own platform for that 15 minutes of fame - social media.
Sure, we've always criticised our own features in the mirror and wished our nose was a little smaller and skin was a little tighter, but all of this has been amplified and actioned by the 'selfie'. Having your photo taken everyday is the absolute norm now in this digital revolution, so it's not surprising that self-consciousness has come along with that x100. I, myself, openly admit that if I was 23 two decades ago, I probably would have never gotten a nose job - two decades ago i'd have probably hardly noticed. I would, however, have lived a life of insecurity, which I among others no longer have to thanks to cosmetic surgery.
We're so fuelled by 'likes' and comparisons to the Instafamous and it's a constant inner battle of 'why do they have what I don't?' - which goes for much more than features, but that's for another day's general musings.

I'd be a hypocrite if I was saying cosmetic surgery is wrong (and it absolutely isn't, knock yourself out on that botox, darling!) - the question here is when did it become so normal? I remember a time when the term 'boob job' made Katie Price in her Jordan days pop into your mind, and when 'plastic surgery' was a term directly attached to Michael Jackson and carried so much stigma. Jump to 2016 and our new poster girl for cosmetic surgery is Kylie Jenner and over 64% of surgeons saw an increase of millennials and Generation X who are having injectable procedures all of a sudden (and the Brazilian Butt Lift and Rhinoplasty topping the list of surgical). It's safe to say trends are becoming blooming expensive and it's gone further than changing your hair to be a part of it - a general insult in the world of youth today is flat lips and a flat booty.

It's not just about the trends changing, however, it's the developments in the world of cosmetics. In the past 10 years, we've had groundbreaking launches such as CoolSculpting, Kybella and Restylane. Procedures have become more accessible than ever with clinics offering finance plans in pretty much every city now, and not only that - more publicised than ever with the likes of the Kardashians, the cast of Geordie Shore and even our fellow blogging gals documenting their nips and tucks for their loyal followers to see. Can we really call them out for being honest about how they achieved their look?

It's a crazy, contoured new world we're living in, but can we really say having such options at our fingertips now is such a bad thing? I don't know how much Juvederm it took to fill the gap between so much stigma and the 'new norm', but I say hell yaaa to the era of the non-surgical procedure.


invisible monsters quote





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